Friday, December 20, 2013

On Conversations: #interview with the #awardwinning #author Diane Craver

It is my pleasure to welcome the award-winning author, Diane Craver to Conversations today. She's here to talk about book 2 in her Amish Dreams of Plain Daughters series, JUDITH'S PLACE. So, check out the cover and blurb. And get to know Diane by checking out her interview too! And be sure and leave a comment because Diane's giving away a digital copy of either A Joyful Break (the first book in Dreams of Plain Daughters) or Judith's Place to one lucky commenter!

Lisa ~
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JUDITH'S PLACE
(Dreams of Plain Daughters, Book Two)http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FVYVCWA/?tag=crlaofsu-20 

Top Pick and 5 star rating from Night Owl Reviews - "The author held my attention from the very first page until the very last word. If you’re an Amish novel reader, this is one series you should definitely consider looking into." By reviewer, Diana Coyle

Judith Hershberger wonders what her life would have been like had she been born into an English family instead of an Amish one. Would she be happier with the freedom to obtain more schooling as an English young woman instead of being limited to only an eighth grade Amish education?

In Judith’s Place, the second book in the Dreams of Plain Daughters Series, schoolteacher Judith Hershberger yearns to learn more despite the educational restriction imposed on her because of her Amish upbringing. Wanting more than an eighth grade education, she puts off joining the Amish faith. During her rumspringa, she’ll be able to obtain her high school diploma without being shunned. Her father is afraid Judith will leave their Amish community if she passes the GED test. He knows she’s unhappy that Amish women are expected to follow a certain path in life.

When a non-Amish college student, Eliza Dunbar, observes Judith in her classroom, a friendship between the two young women develops. Eliza gives Judith the nudge she needs to study for her GED test. Eliza wonders what it would be like to switch places with Judith to live a simple life without electricity and other modern conveniences. Judith envies Eliza because she is free to attend college.

Jacob Weaver finally gets the courage to ask Judith to go with him to a Sunday singing. Like Judith, he wants to do something that isn’t allowed in their Plain community. Jacob wants to get his driver’s license so he can drive a truck to make the deliveries for the lumberyard. He needs to earn enough money to buy his own small farm. But even though it sounds plausible, Jacob feels stress with trying to learn to drive a truck instead of a buggy. Once he accomplishes this, Jacob plans to become baptized and join the Amish church.

Will Judith decide to stay in her Amish community or will she decide to leave in order to attend college? Will Judith’s friendship with Jacob influence her as she finds her place?


Amazon / Barnes and Noble / Kobo / iBooks


Interview with Diane Craver

Tell us about your new release, JUDITH’S PLACE.

Judith Hershberger wonders what her life would have been like had she been born into an English family instead of an Amish one. Would she be  happier with the freedom to obtain more schooling as an English young woman instead of being limited to only an eighth grade Amish education?

In Judith’s Place, the second book in the Dreams of Plain Daughters Series, schoolteacher Judith Hershberger yearns to learn more despite the educational restriction imposed on her because of her Amish upbringing. Wanting more than an eighth grade education, she puts off joining the Amish faith. During her rumspringa, she’ll be able to obtain her high school diploma without being shunned. Her father is afraid Judith will leave their Amish community if she passes the GED test. He knows she’s unhappy that Amish women are expected to follow a certain path in life.
When a non-Amish college student, Eliza Dunbar, observes Judith in her classroom, a friendship between the two young women develops. Eliza gives Judith the nudge she needs to study for her GED test. Eliza wonders what it would be like to switch places with Judith to live a simple life without electricity and other modern conveniences. Judith envies Eliza because she is free to attend college.

Jacob Weaver finally gets the courage to ask Judith to go with him to a Sunday singing. Like Judith, he wants to do something that isn’t allowed in their Plain community. Jacob wants to get his driver’s license so he can drive a truck to make the deliveries for the lumberyard. He needs to earn enough money to buy his own small farm. But even though it sounds plausible, Jacob feels stress with trying to learn to drive a truck instead of a buggy.
Will Judith decide to stay in her Amish community or will she decide to leave in order to attend college? Will Judith’s friendship with Jacob influence her as she finds her place?

Why do you write Amish fiction?

My inspiration for writing an Amish series came from my sweet late mother, Laoma Oberly Wilson. She lived a long Christian life and enjoyed being a wife, mother and grandmother.  Her grandfather was a Mennonite minister, and she shared many stories about him. Even though she wasn’t Amish and later wasn’t Mennonite, she kept many of their Christian beliefs while attending a Protestant church.

Recently I worked on reissuing A GIFT FOREVER, which happens to be based loosely on my father, Horace Wilson. It hit me how he had some things in common with the Amish. I realized how the way he did his farming was a bit like the Amish. Let me explain. While farming his eighty some acres, he used his two work horses, Lois and Dick, to haul manure for the fields. He also hitched them to the hay wagon during the summer while I stayed on the wagon to steer them to the next spot in the field. Then he pitched the hay onto the wagon. How I wish I had pictures of my dad and me working together. However, he used his tractor for planting, plowing, and cultivating. I can understand the Amish’s love of horses because my dad loved his horses. He used the simple way of using horses for farming when he wanted, and used the more convenient tractor for other types of farm work. Combining both methods were important to him as a farmer.

By the way, the community in my Amish series is fictional, but exists close to Wheat Ridge which is an actual Amish community in the southern part of Ohio where I live.

Tell me three things about yourself that would surprise your readers.

  1. I was a carhop during high school for 3 years. My kids thought I wore roller skates to take orders but I never did.
  2. When I was young I wanted to have a dozen children, but changed my mind after babysitting for four mischievous children one summer. We were blessed with six children and one little grandson with two grandbabies on the way.
  3. We lived in 3 different houses on the same street. Finally, we got off this street and have downsized to a ranch.
What are you working on now and what’s next?

I recently started writing Fleeting Hope, Book 3 for my Dreams of Plain Daughters Series. Jacob Weaver is in a buggy accident and in a coma. This reminds schoolteacher Ruth Yoder of her fiancĂ©’s death from a buggy accident. She wants to be supportive for Judith as she waits for Jacob to come out of his coma, but it’s not easy for Ruth. After years of being single, Ruth wonders if it’s time for her to have a second love.

Parting comments?

Lisa, thanks for having me here. I’ll be around if anyone has any questions for me.

Where can readers find you on the internet?

Website: http://www.dianecraver.com
Blog: http://www.dianecraver.com/blog
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Diane-Craver
Jewels of the Quill (A group of 12 authors I belong to): www.jewelsofthequill.com

 
As the youngest in the family, growing up on a farm in Findlay, Ohio, Diane often acted out characters from her own stories in the backyard. In high school she was the student sitting in class with a novel hidden in front of her propped up textbook. Before starting on her writing career, Diane was a schoolteacher and play director.

She met her husband while teaching at an orphanage, and they married three years later. While raising their six children in southwestern Ohio, Diane started writing non-fiction. Later, she decided it would be a nice escape to write fiction plus keep sane with a full and noisy household.

Several non-fiction articles of Diane's have been published in Woman's World Weekly, The Catholic Telegraph, Virtue, Down Syndrome Today, WritersWeekly.com, and several other publications. Her book, The Christmas of 1957, was reissued under the title A Christmas Gift. It placed second in the 2010 Preditors & Editors Poll (novel category) and received 5 stars from the Midwest Book Review. She writes contemporary romance, inspirational mainstream, chick-lit mystery, and non-fiction books. Her novels have received great reviews from readers and reviewers.

Diane has published through a variety of houses, including Publishing by Rebecca J. Vickery, Samhain Publishing, Whimsical Publications, Victory Tales Press and Booklocker.com. She writes fun and inspiring stories filled with memorable characters. Diane gives thanks to God daily for all her wonderful blessings.

Recently, Diane has enjoyed publishing her first Amish romance, A JOYFUL BREAK (Dreams of Plain Daughters, Book One)and reissued MARRYING MALLORY with a new fun chapter.

Learn more about Diane and her books at http://www.dianecraver.com

Important Note: A CHRISTMAS GIFT is basically the same story as The CHRISTMAS of 1957 but has been revised with a new chapter and with approximately 8000 words added to the new edition. A CHRISTMAS GIFT has also received great reviews.

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